A Branding Situation

Social media has indisputably acted as the driving catalyst in the success of MTV’s reality show, “The Jersey Shore.” “The Jersey Shore” revolutionized reality television with its comical play on the New Jersey stereotype and it’s ability to capture promiscuous behavior and excessive partying on camera. The showed debuted at the end of 2009— right into the rush of Web 2.0. Television, the primary channel for the show, is most responsible for giving life to the program while social media is responsible for giving, what appears to be, the gift of immortality. In other words, social media provides a longer shelf life. For example, when the allotted 60 minutes are up, sites like Facebook and Twitter allow the entertainment to carry on in a more personalized setting.

To get a better grasp on the impact, here is a fun fact: according to an infographic on Mashable, on the night of season two’s premiere, the Jersey Shore topic was tweeted up to 16,000 times within one hour.

With a cast full of ridiculous personalities, it is hard not to watch. One particular cast member, Mike “The Situation” Sorrentino is the big brother of the group. Mike has easily branded himself with his signature chiseled abs and charming demeanor while his nickname “The Situation” consistently proves to be his biggest trademark. It began in season one as Mike constantly talked in third person and always cracked silly puns off his name. He was ignorantly unaware of the self-brand he was creating until the cast learned of the show’s success.

His Facebook page is a marketing nucleus. It reeks of poor promotions and contact information overload. His Twitter page isn’t much better. His default image is a head-on shot of his Adonis abs and the wallpaper background is a picture of his quirky smile and flashy jewelry. Surprise, surprise. Although you do have to hand it to the guy. Behind the thick layer of his “Situation” act, Mike is a smart man. He recognized early the conversations that were trending.  He joined these conversations and has now engaged his community of followers. He has labeled his following, “The Situation Nation,” a term constantly promoted on Twitter by a hash tag.

Whether Mike has recognized it or not, he has tapped into these communities through the idea of connectedness. According to a study called “The Appeal of Reality Television to Teen and Pre-Teen Audiences” in the Journal of Advertising Research, it was observed that young people who valued popularity and good looks felt more connected to shows like “The Jersey Shore.” These connected individuals were the ones most likely to move their interests to an online discussion on social networking sites. This discovery truly encompasses the role of communities and the idea of connectedness.

“The Situation” is making the most of his 15 minutes, but who can blame him? #SituationNation

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